Post-Secondary Education

Attending a post-secondary institution – a four-year college or university, a community college or other post-secondary training program – can present new opportunities and challenges. Pursuing post-secondary education allows you to broaden your social horizons while preparing academically for meaningful employment. You have a large array of options when it comes to choosing a post-secondary learning environment.

More and more high school students with disabilities plan to continue their education in post-secondary schools, including vocational and career schools, two- and four- year colleges and universities. You need to be well informed about your rights and responsibilities, as well as the responsibilities post-secondary schools have toward you. Being well informed will help ensure you have a full opportunity to enjoy the benefits of the post-secondary education experience without confusion or delay. 

Here are some helpful programs pertaining to post-secondary education:

Financial Aid for Students with Disabilities: Lists numerous scholarship options for students with disabilities that range from national financial aid opportunities to local opportunities within the United States and Canada.

Going to College: Another website designed for teens with disabilities. Provides information about planning for college, including selecting a college, financial aid and picking a major.

HEATH Resource Center (HEATH): An online clearinghouse on postsecondary education for individuals with disabilities. Answers students’ questions about educational and training options available after high school.

College Information for Students with Disabilities: A website which has information about knowing your rights, preparing for college and how to succeed in college.

Think College Transition Checklist: Gives family members an easy-to-use list of topics that should be considered when discussing the transition from high school to college. This website also includes a database of postsecondary education programs for students with intellectual disabilities.

The National Center for Fair and Open Testing: A website which lists colleges and universities which deemphasize the use of standardized tests for admissions.

You can find information through the Georgia Inclusive Post-secondary Education Consortium about options available in Georgia.